Latest reviews

8.5
sarahforrest
Ambassador
Played on: 25 February 2021

Another great golf course which sits on the English Welsh borders. Kington is the highest 18 hole golf course in England at 1284 feet above sea level, at its highest point. The beauty of Kington is most of the climbing is done by car as you snake your way up the clubhouse. On one of those beautiful sunny days its the best place to see over towards the Brecon Beacons, The Black Mountains, The Malvern Hills and the Shropshire and Clee Hills. Construction started in 1925 under the watchful eye of golf course designer Major Cecil Hutchinson. Building a reputation in his own right after working with Braid at Gleneagles and Carnoustie. It has to be said, it is stunning at the top. The golf course is a haven of manicured pasture with far-reaching views over Herefordshire, Worcestershire, Breconshire, Radnorshire, Shropshire, Gloucestershire and Monmouthshire. The heathland course has all the elements for fantastic play, all the hazards one might expect of its location, plus some. There are no bunkers or water hazards at Kington, it doesn’t need them. The fairways are slightly spongy but not too much give that you end up popping the ball in the sky! The elevation changes, the dramatic grass bunkers and the rough are enough to keep you on your toes on this course. I had a friend visit from the Netherlands, it was her first time playing such a golf course and she loved it. I wanted to show her something different, Kington not only fit the bill, plus.

6.1
ti
tibo75015
Bronze
Played on: 25 February 2021
Handicap while playing: 3.5

Entretien satisfaisant, bons greens, bons départs fairways et bunkers "équitables". Club house accueillant, même si un brin plus restaurant qu'ambiance club. Practice optimisé. Le seul mais principal bémol : avoir voulu dessiner un parcours de Golf sur un terrain aussi peu plat... Cela génère des dénivelés qui coupent les papattes, et qui ne présentent pas grand intérêt golfique. On s'attend plus à voir débouler les chèvres de Manon qu'une balle de Golf. Après, force est de reconnaître que les terrains plats ne sont pas légions dans la région, et que ce golf offre aux Marseillais une issue. A titre personnel, hors championnat par équipe, je ne vois pas l'intérêt d'aller y jouer au Green Fee.

8.7
sarahforrest
Ambassador
Played on: 25 February 2021

Wales or England? One of the quirky things about Llanymynech is one doesn’t really know where it is! So much so that hole number four, a dog leg left par four of only 323/340 yards is where you tee off in Wales and putt out in England. An elevated tee box encourages the brave to go over the trees in a straight line to the green. Or take on the acute corner and get on it two. Either way this SI9 hole is quite playable. Llanymynech is actually in Wales, however as the only way to get there by car is through England, it carries an English postcode. LLanymynech almost plays a cluster of holes at a time differently. Arguably giving you more variety in just 18 holes. Then you get the 18th, again with an elevated tee with a mound right in the way as you take your drive. In reality that mound shouldn’t be in play, but you know, sometimes, it just is! In stark contrast the 9th is a relatively open hole but is the hardest hole on the course being a par 5 at 419/546 yards, SI 1. Another unique feature about Llanymynech is when you’re at the top of the hill you can see up to as many as five counties. These counties are Powys, Dyfed, Clwyd, Shropshire and Staffordshire. There is a map at the top so you can identify which landmarks you are seeing as you brave the highest part of the course. Naturally, it is absolutely beautiful on a warm summers day and absolutely miserably on a cold wet one!

8.8
sarahforrest
Ambassador
Played on: 25 February 2021

A great parkland course, who’s relative newness doesn’t detract from it being a fantastic play and location just an hour and a half from Dublin. This beautiful Irish country Estate extends to approx 500 acres with the River Nore shaping its very existence as it dissects the 180-acre golf course. Completed just 30 years ago in 1991 Jack Nicklaus was called in to give it his signature treatment. Mount Juliet is fun to play, it’s takes in the established estate and works with the mass of water to bring that in play too. Measuring 7,000 yards it has been built to stage championship golf. The Irish Open was meant to be played here last year but wasn’t due to Covid. It is a number of years since I played Mount Juliet. I often wonder about changes that might have to happen to improve the course and whether those changes actually have improved it. It seemed pretty special to me when I played there! But what of its name? Several changes in name for the estate have included Waltons Grove and Kendals Grove, depending on who owed the Estate at that time. But as we all enjoy a good love story, it was the Earl of Carrick who named it Mount Juliet after his wife, Lady Julianna Butler, aka Juliet.

8.9
ja
jaimebrunet
Beginner
Played on: 25 February 2021
Handicap while playing: 9.0

Excelente campo con una gran historia Green y calles con una mejora excepcional Gran idea cambiar a par 4 el hoyo 2, corto pero delicado, el par se paga caro.

8.6
sarahforrest
Ambassador
Played on: 25 February 2021

Newport Golf Club stands 300 feet above sea level with a yardage from 5814 to 6500. Located in Llwyni Wood the golf holes circumnavigate the woodland in the middle of the course whilst capitalising on the beautiful established trees and gently undulating terrain. ⁠ ⁠ Mature oak trees are the first thing you notice as you start to play Newport GC, it is no coincidence that the club logo is an Oak tree! Certainly, this mature parkland course is one that screams history, with one pondering, if only the trees could talk. ⁠ ⁠ Regarded as one of the finest parkland courses in South Wales the current site of the golf course has grown and matured nurturing this natural look. It also far-reaching views across the landscape and over towards the Bristol Channel. ⁠ ⁠ Parkland courses are often overlooked when visiting the UK in favour of links golf, but playing such a grown up course has its own considerations. ⁠ ⁠ Whilst the mighty oak does dominate many a hole, the woodland is diverse and includes birch and beech too. Bearing in mind its maturity, the golf club also has a natural history group who monitor and report the flora and fauna of the golf course, working in harmony with the green keepers. It is a shapely course, with woodland, sloping greens and the odd ditch or hump across the fairway. There were also some very long holes which could suit the big hitters. ⁠.

8.7
sarahforrest
Ambassador
Played on: 25 February 2021

The Oxfordshire is not an old course in fact it was only built in 1993. A unique blend of English countryside meeting it’s then Japanese owners requests designed by an American, Rees Jones. Rees Jones of Torres Pines and Pinehurst fame. It is true many a great course has claimed to be an inland links but I think the Oxfordshire is one that can say that with conviction, despite it being based in the middle of the Chilterns. This Rees Jones design beguiles from the first glance with its softly lined fairways. Its wispy grass flirting in the wind beckoning you in. Once you start to play the Oxfordshire, you’re in a different world, only being bought back to reality by an exceptional halfway house at the far end of the course. It isn’t the 9 out,9 in design of some, you are literally at the furthest point from the 5th tee. The halfway house comes into play on a few holes. I always liked playing the par 4,8th hole with the water on the right and the green tantalising you in the distance with its solitary tree teasing you to think big Almost like an island green, the brave can take on the water with their second shot, the sensible follow the fairway round the mouth of the green. There is one hole that most people do talk about when playing The Oxfordshire, the 17th. A long par 5 with an open tee box to hit into oblivion. Placement is key here as it determines the next shot. Over the lake at almost the widest point or go around and play the whole of the par 5. The green is tucked all the way to the other side of the lake. Shallow in its approach back to front with bunkers in play. It is definitely one of those risk and reward shots!

8.5
sarahforrest
Ambassador
Played on: 25 February 2021

Two unique 9 holes merging to form the traditional 18 holes of golf. This James Braid design dates back to 1905 and is somewhat unusual. ⁠ ⁠ Situated in Morfa Bychan, just 3 miles from Porthmadog the genius is the front nine, whilst not a parkland is best described as heathland. With the back nine being the links we all know and love. ⁠ ⁠ When playing Porthmadog, I remember playing along the estuary, it was windy and the ball wasn’t playing my game! I got up to the 11th green and took stock of where I was. The estuary was in full sight, a light grey bluish colour, with whispy off-white and green long grasses waving in the foreground. To my left was the most beautiful whitewashed stone-built cottage nestled into the valley. I remember remarking to my playing partners that I’d love to live there; wild, rugged and with a great golf course on my doorstep - who wouldn’t! ⁠ ⁠ A friendly club who welcome you with Welsh hospitality If you’re after a unique experience add Porthmadog to your list. If you’re on holiday it’s a great course to get a bit of everything and satisfy those golf withdrawal symptoms. And whilst on holiday in the beautiful North Wales Countryside, think about the Ffestiniog and Highlands Railway steam trains as they chug along as a subtle reminder of yesteryear. ⁠ ⁠ Playing Porthmadog makes you think differently about your round and also about club selection from the differing front to back nine holes. A heathland, a links, dunes, brooks, big greens, great views towards Snowdonia over Cardigan bay- Porthmadog has it all. ⁠.

9.2
sarahforrest
Ambassador
Played on: 25 February 2021

Originally a nine-hole course the James Braid Queens Course opened in 1919. Later being extended to a full 18 holes in 1925. Often regarded as the little sister to the Kings and the newer PGA Centenary courses. Shorter in length than its big brothers, don’t be lulled into a false sense of security by this par 68 course. It packs a punch with its receptive fairways and great quality greens. Even in the wettest Perthshire weather, those greens seem to hold up well. ⁠ ⁠ In 2017 course realignment bought it back to the original Braid design. The course had gone through a series of renovations to suit the time which meant some bunkers were lost into the rough. Using old imagery the original design was reinstated calling for 89 bunkers being re-built and some drainage work is undertaken. ⁠ ⁠ I recall the 13th, a pretty par 3 with sculptured fairways around heather and water in play. Offset by the backdrop of tall trees looming in the distance. Quite an intimidating hole despite its relatively short length of only 129/140 yards. ⁠ ⁠ The closing hole, aptly called ‘Queen’s Hame’ does entice you across the water to an inviting, reasonably wide fairway, before it softly bends left to the green insight. It has to be said this is one of the most welcoming closing holes. Not least because of the Dormy House looming ever-present on the left as you putt out. ⁠ ⁠ The onsite hotel was refurbished in 2016. This 232 bedroom hotel wraps itself around a central courtyard entrance with its grey, almost gothic in style, granite arms outstretched to envelop you into its warmth. A lovely bar and plenty of food choices are available, so you’ll be spoilt for choice as you ponder the 'what ifs’ of your round on the Queens Course⁠.

7.8
ti
tibo75015
Bronze
Played on: 25 February 2021
Handicap while playing: 3.5

Parcours de golf sélectif. Entretien en constante amélioration, même si la nature des sols est hostile à l'évacuation rapide des pluies abondantes. Greens remarquables, et souvent petits. Fairways un brin étroits avec des roughs qui peuvent être démoniaques. Le vent peut rendre la partie "intéressante" pour évaluer son niveau de jeu en circonstances compliquées. Proximité d'Aix et de Marseille, sans réelle concurrence golfique, si ce n'est Fuveau. Le seul gros bémol, la zone industrielle avec ses grands hangars et l'axe de circulation Aix/Marignane. En gros, le paysage ne fait pas rêver.

Play golf in Europe

Today golf in Europe is well established throughout the North and West of Europe and is making steady progress into Central Europe and Southeastern regions. Countries with the highest number of golf facilities are: England, Germany, France, Scotland, Sweden, Ireland, Spain and Italy. Based on the density of above-average golf clubs in a certain country (or region), our rating per country suggests that the following countries are well worth a visit when planning your next golfbreak or golf holiday: United Kingdom (incl. Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland), Ireland, The Netherlands and Belgium. Most golfers however still flock to popular and sunny golf destinations like Portugal (Algarve), Spain and Turkey.
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